A weak assumption at best

When I was a prepubescent, I was pretty chubby – though the clothing manufacturers of the time called the larger size “husky”.

Did they really believe such a term would make a little fat kid feel better?

I assure you, it didn’t.

For me sweets were the enemy – and the fact that I’d rather be sitting inside watching game shows on television, than outside exercising.

When I finally hit puberty though, and battled a case of Mononucleosis, I had lost a considerable amount of weight. I vowed right then and there to never fight the battle of the bulge again.

So much for that.

My wife and I are still on diets, which seem to stretch the length of our marriage. Why does food have to taste so damn good?

But today I heard something in mixed company that I don’t think I’ve ever heard before. That people no longer care if you call them “fat”.

Really?

It was said that the last few generations no longer care if they are labeled with terms suggesting they are overweight. That it’s only those in their 50’s and above who worry about such references.

I’m 37 years old and couldn’t disagree more.

While I’m very comfortable with the weight I am right now, I know all too well what it feels like to have your weight called into question – to be the cause of ridicule, bullying and abuse at the hands of an unsympathetic society.

Sadly that society is still in existence.

Young children are bullied each and every day about their weight and body imperfections, teenage girls are bulimic in an attempt to keep a perfect figure and many still feel embarrassed walking into weight loss centers.

Forgive me, but that doesn’t sound like any generation is accepting of being referred to as “fat”.

I’m a firm believer that people should be accepted for the person they are on the inside – something I wished for constantly growing up.

But to say that people are no longer insulted or offended when you call them “fat” is nothing more than a weak assumption at best.

Share